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is that a child like bill clinton begins to feel like he has the responsibility of bringing healing to that family, of redeeming it, of creating honor where there's dishonor. and he's so, he basically sets out to be the person who's going to rescue and redeem the family. he is an incredible student. he's front of his class. he becomes very active in boys' nation which is kind of a junior american legion. gets nominated to go to washington as the quote-unquote boys' nation candidate for u.s. senate. goes to washington. he's already six feet tall. he strides to the front of the line when they go to the white house to see president kennedy, and then when kennedy finishes his speech, bill clinton lopes forward and gets his picture taken with, alongside of john f. kennedy. he's so proud. he's so proud. and he already is dedicate today the idea that he is -- dedicated to the idea that he is going to be the person who is going to bring complete honor to the family. he already, by the age of 17, is planning to be elected attorney general of arkansas, then governor of arkansas and then president of the uni
as petraeus is enough to team public and what we got rid george washington? bill clinton is not the first and the worst. and there, done that, a long history of it. it pains me to say even abraham lincoln visited a. say it isn't so, but it happened. the details on matters itchy. there's not a lot of letters written about this, but lincoln's best friend was joshua speed and speed was perhaps as dashing and from unlucky with the ladies as lincoln was homely and awkward unlucky in romance. they always called one another by their last names. speed, lincoln. speed and that is linking his door and didn't have a place to stay, so what can let speed stay upstairs at the general store. during the friendship, speakers using services of a professional woman. you imagine lincoln upstairs with a pillow over his head trying to mind his own business as speed is doing his business. he basically says that after the woman. it's been too long. on the abraham lincoln would do this. it appears i cannot speak for a letter of introduction. with a professional women. i don't mean agriculture appeared as an occup
tyson did not like some of bill clinton's policies when he was governor the first time around because he was making some reforms around trucking, the trucking industry. and, of course, if you're a big poultry player, you're trucking a lot of chickens. and so bill clinton got punished. he didn't get elected to be governor when he ran again x then he reformed -- and then he reformed as far as tyson was concerned. so he has had the support of tyson ever since then. so when the clinton administration came into office, they facilitated the first stage of privatizing meat inspection which we have been living with ever since and which now the obama administration is trying to take a step further. the clinton administration privatized it in the processing, you know, meat -- animals are slaughtered, and then they're sent to another step where they're cut up and processed and packaged. so in the processing there's been this privatized system that we've done a lot of work showing how dangerous it is at food and water watch. now the obama administration wants to increase this program especially for
the clinton administration after the u.s. joined the wpa, but the very controversial farm bill passed. that is the legislation to completely get away with the remaining new deal protections. it deregulated what was our to begun in the 1950s, except all government intervention had eliminated all of the final vestiges of the programs like the grain reserve in the most immediate result after that bill passed, you might remember it, it was called freedom to farm. farmers quickly started calling it their bill. it was the dramatic increase in the production of commodities. because all of the programs that have kept them out of production were now being planned and so by 1999, the price of corn was 50% above 1996 levels. i'm sorry, 50% below 1996 levels. and corn was down 41%. farmers were in economic distress. it was all sorts of pressure on congress to do something. food industry lobbying meant that the policymakers reinstated some supply management and instead congress used taxpayer money to keep farmers afloat so they wouldn't be putting pressure in rural areas on the members of congress
to do degnomic medicine, we need a much faster network. bill clinton, the former president, was saying we can't really expect our businesses to compete internationally if they only have access to speeds a fourth the speed of korea, and he's absolutely right. >> host: reed hundt, energy is included in your book on testimonying. technology. why? >> guest: to quote the smashing pumpkins, we all know that we need a clean energy economy where it's really, really cheap to buy the energy and where the energy that you're buying is not polluting the atmosphere. it is not causing greenhouse gases that are driving up the temperature and producing droughts. it is not producing a number of other health-related effects from from air pollution. we all know this. we know what we're after. how are we going to get there? the way we discovered in the book is it's pretty simple. could you have the federal government buy all the new things that are necessary and then give them away? it's not practical, it's not going to happen. we don't have that capability in the federal government to add to the deficit.
california. the first george bush from texas via connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas and the second bush from texas. so 2008 in some ways watershed election. ends the 40-year period of sun belt dominance. and there were issues that were critical in the politics that developed, that came out of the sun belt. they tended to have a conservative cast to them. tended to be oriented around issues of strong national defense, of an opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise politics. and also it's in the sun belt in the south and southwest, that we see the rise of what -- by the 1970s we'll be talk about as the religious right. the rise of evangelical involvement in the process. so national defense, he was a staunch anticommunist and played an important role in right wing anticommunist politics in the late 1960s, one of the things that led him to switch parties in 1964. he was a key figure in opposing labor unions and did so long people like barry gold water. early in his career he was a staunch advocate of unions in south carolina, back in the 30s and 40s, when the union vote was an
presidents. in bill clinton's second term, during the unpleasantness, remember when hillary clinton was said to be taking the lead. she was going to appear on the today program in every thing. i wanted to a palm and so is forced to use what we saw her mid-name. i do think we use that name of origin or slave name. and so it's up to our misurata to prove those white house is that. it's like to face to show that it is just gomorrah. [laughter] obama jokes about having a funny name, but it was a pretty good name to ryan. unfortunate you step on the rhymes with osama bin laden. yokohama, slap your mama. so i get worried when they start talking about presidential candidates. i did a similar book to this in 2008 call deciding the next decider come a long, i think -- we shouldn't be afraid of the word epic. interrupted by other poems. this is the same sort of book, except it has a little pro-senate. the call them applause for pros. one of the syntactical list to gingrich, the wearer has cheated in life too seriously zero wise, desperately tries to make light of it back costs. [laughter] newts think
are not with the use are not what they used to be, at least if you're me they're not. it cannot bill clinton or naomi wolf or whatever, it used to be that there were bookstores, as you probably know, bookstores all of the country. and now my book tours are basically town halls in seattle, house books here, politics and prose in d.c. one in new york, one in boston. and i said to my agent, frankly, i'm not trying to go to more bookstores, hard work to travel all over. i have two kids and everything has changed. but i said isn't there -- i've got friends in subsisting want to see. i'm on the west coast. there really isn't powell's on the west coast. so i know there's a few bookstores in san francisco. what you have here is very special. want to acknowledge a couple of groups but if you're interested in urban design issues in this area, groups to talk to first problem is see in your casket, the congress for urban is him. i'm sure you can find an online. but they are concerned about all the issues i'll be talking about tonight and there's a group that for 20 years now has been pushing these issues forward
the bush years. a lot of folks who thought what's going to have to talk radio when they don't have bill clinton to kick reason anymore? actually thrived during that period. you have glen beck, sean hannity , major national voice. >> host: what does it say to talk radio now in comparison to cable news outlets? we have seen people from talk radio move move over to cable news outlets. >>> sean hannity, glen beginning. sean hannity is one of the only guys to have maintained both a presence in tv and radio on a long-term basis. glen beck was in cable news for a while. has his own cable network now internet-wise, but didn't last long on fox news. or hlm. rush limbaugh had a beer four-year stint on tv but -- had a brief four-year stint on tv but both over those guys, they're domain was radio and that's where they got the big ratings from. >> talking with fred lucas, the story of the talk radio giants who took up the political media establishment. >> thanks very much.
through the -- what was then called the biden crime bill, became the clinton bill, which you have all taken advantage of. we're on the floor debating this issue, anden daniel patrick moynihan stood up and said, as only he could, he told the story of the valentine's day massacre in 1929. and how it shocked the world when seven gangsters were gunned down in cold blood. it made the front page, according to daniel patrick moynihan, of every major paper in the nation and many around the world. then the looked up and said, but in 1992, when a woman saved her three-month-old baby from execution by hiding that baby under the bed, but she was shot and killed, along with her husband and her teenage son, that story -- and he took out "the new york times --" turned up on the second section, buried in the back of "the new york times." it wasn't front-page news. it was barely news at all. i'll never forget what he said. he said i call that defining deviancy down. defining deviancy down. how it wasn't even news. if that happened in 1929, it would have been astonishing. well, folks, we can no longer
during the george bush years. a lot of folks thought what is going to happen when they don't have bill clinton to kick around anymore? they thrived during that period. glen beck, sean hannity and michael savage became major national voices in that time period. >> what is the state of talk radio now in comparison to cable news outlets? lot of people have moved over to cable news outlets and become pundits on television. >> in most cases, sean hannity, glen beck, the interesting thing about sean hannity is he is one of the only guys to maintain both a presence on tv and in radio on a long-term basis. glen beck was in cable news for a while, has his own cable network now internetwise but in last long on fox news, rush limbaugh had a brief four year stint on tv but those two guys were pretty much radio, where they get the big ratings. >> fred lucas, author of the right frequency:the story of the radio giant to shook up the political and media establishment. >> here's a look at some books being published this week. tom daschle, former senate majority leader from south dakota and reporter ch
concentration. when i was a point person for president clinton and passing the brady bill and the late part of november 93 and the assault weapons ban in the house in the spring of 94, it was those to those very focused on criminal acts nice. president clinton's legislation post-columbine did not pass. so the notion that everybody should rely on the energy and force of newton, i would caution not to do that. it's galvanized to have a conversation internally and have a serious conversation, but for the assault weapons ban, were done with columbine would have been in virginia. i do believe in the last four years, the last eight years of politics, what happened there has made all of us have a discussion and appropriate politics to be focused for the president to introduce this legislation or package undecided what is going to do by executive order. but we are at a tipping point is postponed, delayed or for whatever reason hasn't happened. my small plaintiff caution anything but the last time i had success, goes back in 93 and 94. those were pretty columbine. his entire package fell flat. >> co
was the point person for president clinton and passing the brady bill in the late part of november 93 and the assault weapon ban in the house in the spring of 94, those two those are very focused on criminal access. president clinton's legislation post-columbine did not pass. so the notion that everybody should rely on the energy and force of newton, i would caution not to do that. it's galvanized the country to have an honest conversation and look internally and had a serious conversation. but the assault weapon ban was done without a columbine would have been in virginia. i do believe just in the last four years on the loudspeakers of politics would have been there has made all of us a discussion that is sitting on the sideline to be focused to introduces legislation or package and decide what legislatively he's going to do by executive order. but we are at a tipping point to have a discussion that's been postponed, delayed. but my small flashing yellow light of caution is anything to laugh time we really had success, which goes back to 93 and 94, those are pretty columbine. his ent
bill and became the clinton bill that you've all taken great advantage of over the years, we run the floor debating this issue indeed a patrick moynihan and said how only he could come of the story of the valentine's day massacre in 1929 and how shocked the world when sending gangsters were gunned down in cold blood. he made the front page according to daniel patrick moynihan of every major paper in the nation and many around the world. but then he said, 1992, when a woman saved her three -month-old tv from execution by hiding not be not be the end of the bed, she was shot and killed along with her husband and teenage son. that story turned up on the second section buried in the back of the knee or times. it wasn't front-page news. it is barely news at all. he said i caught that defining deviancy down, hot wasn't even news. that happened in 1929 would have been astonishing. folks, we can no longer continue to define deviancy. we cannot wait any longer. the time has come. as you know this week i delivered a set of recommendations to president obama on how we can better protect ame
the gentleman mr. smith. chris smith, bill pass pascrell, mr. -- and mr. king. mr. king, you still here. rest of you may have left to go vote, so jim,let get you up here . and mr. mcclinton, you're in this. we can have you join in there also. and bill, now begin with the gentleman mr. smith. mr. smith, you're recognize 8. >> thank you mr. chairman and member of the committee. i want to associate myself from the remarking about -- [inaudible] our delegation is very strongly bipartisan in a bipartisan fashion is supported the amendment. he talked about 346,000 homes have been destroyed. 11,000 uninhasn'tble. unbelievable. my district has been effected like so many others. i again would ask that the committee make that amendment in order when it votes. i do want to thank you you again for the opportunity to speak about amendment number 85, which would address a critical gap in overall assistance to energy of the vitally important legislation. the substantial portion of the assistance provided during the time of the emergency and this continues has been by faith-based community. in time of the d
to put that tent with clinton. if you were getting hurricanes' every five or six years he would get a bill to there. the storm system in the 30's of any magnitude it made perfect sense when you get it. we're not going to rebuild that the way. so from the science perspective here is my asked. who is making the decisions about where we build, how we build, and building codes. if you're not familiar with the devastates and will take this to the federal government, no. this is that decisions are made every day where risk exposure occurs. on the day-to-day transactional basis you probably don't really see this, but this is where decisions are made about where we will kick -- where we build, how we build, the types of building codes we're going to enforce, yet many of these officials under tremendous pressure generate revenue. how the local officials to their revenue is jobs and growth. have you ever seen anyone running for office seminar committee to give small? it's always jobs and growth. that is the mantra. yet they're having to make decisions that oftentimes are short-term, very limi
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16